Tags

, , , , ,

Ingredients:

  • 18 pints (~10 litres) raw Friesian Holstein milk
  • 4ml vegetarian rennet

Another delivery from  Hook & Son, this time destined to become a Stilton-esque blue cheese!

Pouring out the milk

Pouring out the milk

After heating to 29C, a small amount of DVI starter along with some rehydrated Penicillium Roqueforti and Geotrichium Candidium was stirred in.

Mixing in the rehydrated mould

Mixing in the rehydrated mould

After 30 minutes, when the pH had dropped slightly from 6.5 to 6.4, added diulted rennet and stirred thoroughly, being sure to mix in the cream which had settled on top during the starting phase.

Clean break

Clean break

A clean break was achieved around 30 minutes later, with no measurable change in pH.

Cutting the curd

Cutting the curd

Cut the curd into large cubes first, then progressively smaller until the curd cubes are around the size of peas.

Cut curd

Cut curd

Stir gently a few times and leave to heal for about an hour, or until the curd has completely settled on the bottom – at this stage, the whey pH is 6.3.

Decanting the whey

Decanting the whey

Once the curds have settled, decant out as much whey as possible until you’re left with a solid curd mass.

Curds

Curds

Scoop out the curd into a cheesecloth lined tray or colander - the picture above doesn’t show the cheesecloth as I forgot it, which made it a massive pain to move the curd around!

Leave curds to drain in a warm (~24C) place.

Drained curd

Drained curd

Once the curd has drained, cut it into small pieces (milling), salt and mix.

Milling the curd

Milling the curd

Salting the curd

Salting the curd

Mixing the milled and salted curd

Mixing the milled and salted curd

Finally move the milled curd to clean moulds.

Curds in moulds

Curds in moulds

Place the moulds in a cool, humid environment (18C @ 80% humidity) to drain, turning daily.

Drained curds

Drained curds

After 5 days, the curd mass should have shrunk away from the sides of the moulds and can be removed.

Rubbed up

Rubbed up

Use a knife to smooth out the curd sides and fill in any surface gaps – this is called “rubbing up”.

Wrapped up

Wrapped up

Wrap the curd in wax paper (available from Moorlands) and place in a cool, humid environment (14C @ 80% humidity) for a few weeks until a rind has formed.

I’ll update this post with pictures as and when things occur, most notably the piercing which is always fun!

I’ve got high hopes for this blue – as long as I can maintain humidity it should turn out nice and tasty given the great milk source!

Update: unfortunately I wasn’t able to turn these for a few days, so one side ended up a bit more moist than the other, which has caused a few problems from which they’ll hopefully recover.

They’ve now been speared once and are maturing away nicely.

Note the moist tops

Note the moist tops

About these ads